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20110722
20110722
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan describes the move against an american citizen arrested in the u.s. this week and accused of working for pakistan. this is the latest in a rapidly deteriorating relationship which was highlighted when the u.s. killed osama bin laden and pakistan. the prime minister is currently in london. my colleague asked if he understood why the u.s. had not told pakistan. >> that is the thing we did not like. >> you understand why? >> they did not want to share their victory with pakistan, they only want to share defeat. >> what they're indicating is that they did not trust the military and your security services to not leak it. >> when we had intelligence sharing with them and the people, the most wanted terrorist of al qaeda, we helped them. there was no reason not to share with us. >> did the isi note that osama bin laden was less than a mile away from your defense academy? >> he had been there for a long time. i want to ask you one question, whether the world intelligence failed? the whole failure of the world. >> did you know that bin laden was there? did your intelligence service
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
know, in pakistan helping with bomb strikes. >> his initial reports are accurate? he's talking, as you say, about damage done by the drones. then he sends a piece of video that shows him in the company of a top al qaeda. somebody we've been looking for for a long time, and then the mother load of information. he claims he's now rendered medical services to ayman al zawahiri. correct? >> how clever he was, weaving in between two worlds, the cia and al qaeda and convincing everyone he's on their side. but ultimately, as we discover later, he's actually on al qaeda's side in this elaborate plot, an incredible lure was set up by al qaeda using their own video equipment and knowledge it was set up by al qaeda, using their own video equipment and their own knowledge of how the cia works to create something so attractive that the cia could not possibly say no to it. >> the reason that the cia found him credible, although through the jordanians, and he knew the medical history of zawahiri, and it matched the information we from his egyptian files. and now the objective becomes, let's bring him
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)